No time to die (2021)

A long and effective film, with sublime action sequences, sweeping cinematography and a fitting farewell to Daniel Craig.

Rami Malek plays the foreboding villain well, I just wish he had more screen time. The franchise steps out of its usual mould and takes on a fuller, more wholesome approach.

The supporting cast has a great range, leaving an impact even in a limited number of scenes or shots. Watch it for the locales and the stunts which keep you entertained throughout.

3.5/5

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The Legend of Tarzan (2016)

David Yates turns an age old story into an interesting film with gripping drama and action. Not self indulgent at any point, it engages by weaving in the truth with natural aesthetics.

Alexander Skarsgard is perfect as Tarzan. Tall and lean with strong shoulders, he doesn’t appear like a ‘steroid’ body. He moves with the agility and grace of an animal and has the same intensity in his eyes, as his fellows in the jungle. His poise, gait and quiet confidence make him a delight to watch.

Equally matched in every way is Jane, played by Margot Robbie. Not a damsel in distress and well versed with the natural world, she is at home with the tribe and it’s beautiful traditions. A survivor and believer, she faces many odds.

Samuel L. Jackson represents the ally in America, but also a history of the oppressed. He sticks by his friends’ side and lightens the mood for all of us while doing so. Christoph Waltz is once again a merciless and ambitious character, who represents the villain of exploitation and slavery.

A social commentary at its deepest level, with sweeping cinematography and some eloquent visuals, this film was a treat.

3.5/5

Spectre (2015)

A Bored Bond combined with slick Indian censorship results in a series of scenes sewn together for our benefit.

To give director Sam Mendes his due, he has handled the various modes of transport with some remarkable action, but there is no tension.

A lack of adrenaline is precisely what this film suffers from, and it seems Daniel Craig’s apathy towards a character that gave him so much, weakens it further. Bond Girl Lea Seydoux is a combinations of beauty, brains and brawn and puts a little sparkle into the fading Bond.

We miss Judi Dench as ’M’, though Ralph Fiennes does an ok job minus the wit. Monica Bellucci makes a cameo while not so menacing villain Christoph Waltz tries to terrorise but fails.

Ben Whishaw as ‘Q’, Naomie Harris, Andrew Scott provide able support and Dave Bautista leaves an ‘impact’ without saying much.

One of the weaker films and a let down after Skyfall. Points for action and locales, not traditional Bond espionage and spy thrills.

2/5

Big Eyes (2014)

A film based on a true story about a female artist in the 50s, the tale was riveting with excellent production values and a surprisingly small budget of 10 million dollars.

Director Tim Burton presents Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) as a suppressed, dependant house wife who has to part with her identity as an artist when her husband inadvertently sells her painting. What starts as a sales pitch slowly turns into an identity crisis. She plays the part with beautiful restraint and her win at the Golden Globes this year shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody. Her creepy husband with the ‘smile that makes you shudder’ is done brilliantly by German actor Christoph Waltz. He shows his ‘real’ side with sparks and is otherwise the perfect farce.

This film shows the reality of what women had to face in the workplace and at home in the 50s and 60s. It showcases stunning art and strong performances.

3/5