Airlift (2016)

Touted as ‘Akshay Kumar’s career best’ and other such superlatives, I was intrigued to watch it. Having grown up in the Gulf, and lived through a time like this (though only on the news), it was insightful to see a dramatised version of it.

Director Raja Krishna Menon has built an authentic Kuwait (in the tiny emirate of Ras Al Khaimah) and showed us the larger perspective of what happened during its invasion by Iraq. Though certain bits are given superficial treatment, the story as a whole works.

We all know what will happen at the end, but the tension in the plot is built well. I only wish certain proceedings were given the same treatment as most of the film, the weight of the subject matter would have hit us harder. There was a struggle but not enough, it was painful to watch but didn’t rouse emotion.

Akshay Kumar has done better work, though this one is no doubt sincere. He as usual carries the film on his shoulders, communicating a ‘changed man’ very well. Nimrat Kaur, another talented actor, has little screen time, but shows us her prowess too. Purab Kohli has a short but impactful role.

All in all, the film had some missing ingredients which would have made it a complete experience. It was a solid attempt, at a modest budget, a sensible strategy 🙂

3/5

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The Lunchbox (2013)

There are films and there is film making. This movie is the latter and much like it’s name, serves a varied palette of delicate flavours which have to be eaten fresh!

Every nuance of the film, every frame, has a story which completes the recipe of this 109 minute gastronomical delight.

From the invisible ‘aunty’, the annoying colleague, the repressed house wife and the lifeless government worker, the scenes are packed with intelligent insights and a very high emotional quotient, supported by a strong undercurrent of humour and realism.

You can’t help but wonder why our realities are such, but you are hopeful that change is occurring. Awe-inspiring performances by 
Irrfan Khan, Nimrat Kaur, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Bharati Achrekar and Lillete Dubey mirror many facets of human relationships in such a short span of time.

Written and Directed by Ritesh Batra, who should be applauded for his craft, one of the many brilliant lines of the film, which struck a chord deep and strong was, “You forget things if you have no one to tell them to.”

Skip every meal, but not this one.

4/5